If yesterday’s plank rows didn’t cut it for you, here’s a brutal challenge!!! I’m not exaggerating when I say this, the plank row chest press is not only the most challenging chest press I’ve ever performed it’s also one of the difficult exercises I’ve ever attempted period. It’s for this reason I nicknamed it the “Impossible Chest Press” as the level of brutality is through the roof. Furthermore this represents the epitome of full body activation. When combined with a bottoms up protocol these also target just about every biomotor capability in existence including full body stability, motor control, postural alignment, mobility, symmetry, rotary stability, lumbopelvic hip control, foot and ankle activation, shoulder stabilization, core activation, and t-spine mobility. In terms of the execution I’ve found that angling the body slightly from the bench places less tension on the shoulder joint of the planking arm as it allows a more depressed scapula and tucked elbow position. I recommend starting with the double leg variation first. You’ll also notice how I utilize an eccentric isometric protocol here.  There are 2 reasons for this. First, you’re essentially forced to do so as it’s almost impossible to successfully complete these in a controlled fashion without using the eccentric isometric protocol.  In fact, one of the goals for many of the exercises I devise is to force individuals to rely on the eccentric isometric protocol. This exercise is no exception. With that said, even if it weren’t necessary, the other reason why I implement eccentric isometrics is for the enhanced proprioceptive feedback and kinesthetic awareness associated with slow and controlled eccentric muscle actions. In other words, eccentric isometrics help the lifter fine tune their body positioning and movement mechanics by more easily attending to proprioceptive feedback and sensory signals coming from their muscle spindles and central nervous system. Ultimately, this is how one masters their movement - a topic I discuss in great depth in my NEW book Movement Redefined. Read more at LINK IN BIO or copy paste https://www.advancedhumanperformance.com/movement-redefined/ @dr.joelseedman_ahp dr.joelseedman_ahp Joel Seedman

  • Joel Seedman If yesterday’s plank rows didn’t cut it for you, here’s a brutal challenge!!! I’m not exaggerating when I say this, the plank row chest press is not only the most challenging chest press I’ve ever performed it’s also one of the difficult exercises I’ve ever attempted period. It’s for this reason I nicknamed it the “Impossible Chest Press” as the level of brutality is through the roof. Furthermore this represents the epitome of full body activation. When combined with a bottoms up protocol these also target just about every biomotor capability in existence including full body stability, motor control, postural alignment, mobility, symmetry, rotary stability, lumbopelvic hip control, foot and ankle activation, shoulder stabilization, core activation, and t-spine mobility.
In terms of the execution I’ve found that angling the body slightly from the bench places less tension on the shoulder joint of the planking arm as it allows a more depressed scapula and tucked elbow position. I recommend starting with the double leg variation first.
You’ll also notice how I utilize an eccentric isometric protocol here.  There are 2 reasons for this. First, you’re essentially forced to do so as it’s almost impossible to successfully complete these in a controlled fashion without using the eccentric isometric protocol.  In fact, one of the goals for many of the exercises I devise is to force individuals to rely on the eccentric isometric protocol. This exercise is no exception.
With that said, even if it weren’t necessary, the other reason why I implement eccentric isometrics is for the enhanced proprioceptive feedback and kinesthetic awareness associated with slow and controlled eccentric muscle actions. In other words, eccentric isometrics help the lifter fine tune their body positioning and movement mechanics by more easily attending to proprioceptive feedback and sensory signals coming from their muscle spindles and central nervous system. Ultimately, this is how one masters their movement - a topic I discuss in great depth in my NEW book Movement Redefined. Read more at LINK IN BIO or copy paste https://www.advancedhumanperformance.com/movement-redefined/

    @dr.joelseedman_ahp

    6 months ago
  • Atlanta, Georgia
  • If yesterday’s plank rows didn’t cut it for you, here’s a brutal challenge!!! I’m not exaggerating when I say this, the plank row chest press is not only the most challenging chest press I’ve ever performed it’s also one of the difficult exercises I’ve ever attempted period. It’s for this reason I nicknamed it the “Impossible Chest Press” as the level of brutality is through the roof. Furthermore this represents the epitome of full body activation. When combined with a bottoms up protocol these also target just about every biomotor capability in existence including full body stability, motor control, postural alignment, mobility, symmetry, rotary stability, lumbopelvic hip control, foot and ankle activation, shoulder stabilization, core activation, and t-spine mobility. In terms of the execution I’ve found that angling the body slightly from the bench places less tension on the shoulder joint of the planking arm as it allows a more depressed scapula and tucked elbow position. I recommend starting with the double leg variation first. You’ll also notice how I utilize an eccentric isometric protocol here.  There are 2 reasons for this. First, you’re essentially forced to do so as it’s almost impossible to successfully complete these in a controlled fashion without using the eccentric isometric protocol.  In fact, one of the goals for many of the exercises I devise is to force individuals to rely on the eccentric isometric protocol. This exercise is no exception. With that said, even if it weren’t necessary, the other reason why I implement eccentric isometrics is for the enhanced proprioceptive feedback and kinesthetic awareness associated with slow and controlled eccentric muscle actions. In other words, eccentric isometrics help the lifter fine tune their body positioning and movement mechanics by more easily attending to proprioceptive feedback and sensory signals coming from their muscle spindles and central nervous system. Ultimately, this is how one masters their movement - a topic I discuss in great depth in my NEW book Movement Redefined. Read more at LINK IN BIO or copy paste https://www.advancedhumanperformance.com/movement-redefined/ https://scontent-ams4-1.cdninstagram.com/v/t51.2885-15/e15/s640x640/51933401_2222717541380557_6638128686088234265_n.jpg?_nc_ht=scontent-ams4-1.cdninstagram.com&oh=72c8aca05e7b9764608db9382885c6e9&oe=5D5CEB7D dr.joelseedman_ahp

    If yesterday’s plank rows didn’t cut it for you, here’s a brutal challenge!!! I’m not exaggerating when I say this, the plank row chest press is not only the most challenging chest press I’ve ever performed it’s also one of the difficult exercises I’ve ever attempted period. It’s for this reason I nicknamed it the “Impossible Chest Press” as the level of brutality is through the roof. Furthermore this represents the epitome of full body activation. When combined with a bottoms up protocol these also target just about every biomotor capability in existence including full body stability, motor control, postural alignment, mobility, symmetry, rotary stability, lumbopelvic hip control, foot and ankle activation, shoulder stabilization, core activation, and t-spine mobility.
    In terms of the execution I’ve found that angling the body slightly from the bench places less tension on the shoulder joint of the planking arm as it allows a more depressed scapula and tucked elbow position. I recommend starting with the double leg variation first.
    You’ll also notice how I utilize an eccentric isometric protocol here.  There are 2 reasons for this. First, you’re essentially forced to do so as it’s almost impossible to successfully complete these in a controlled fashion without using the eccentric isometric protocol.  In fact, one of the goals for many of the exercises I devise is to force individuals to rely on the eccentric isometric protocol. This exercise is no exception.
    With that said, even if it weren’t necessary, the other reason why I implement eccentric isometrics is for the enhanced proprioceptive feedback and kinesthetic awareness associated with slow and controlled eccentric muscle actions. In other words, eccentric isometrics help the lifter fine tune their body positioning and movement mechanics by more easily attending to proprioceptive feedback and sensory signals coming from their muscle spindles and central nervous system. Ultimately, this is how one masters their movement - a topic I discuss in great depth in my NEW book Movement Redefined. Read more at LINK IN BIO or copy paste https://www.advancedhumanperformance.com/movement-redefined/

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supertaste1 - Andrew Hoffman 5 months ago

This is great total activation. Naturally love of the kettlebell has my heart in single leg bridge patterns (TGU) and bottoms up varieties which were advantageous in executing this. Always learning thanks my colleagues and I appreciate your content.

positivebadvibes - 5 months ago

🙌FOLLOW FOR REAL TIPS FOR A GREAT 10-15 MINUTE WORKOUT WITH REAL RESULTS🙌