Here are two unique ways we can use a yoga block in our yoga practice - and neither of them involve making a pose easier! 😉 . In the first part of this video, I place the block in the middle of my yoga mat and use it as a target to jump up and over from downward dog. . The physical presence of the block on our mat can naturally encourage us to hop *higher* (loading our shoulders more) and more *lightly* than we generally hop without this visual target. . Once we’ve experienced what it feels like to hop in a springier, higher manner, we can remove the block and attempt to re-create these same qualities in our normal hops forward 👍🏽 . (In this video, I have the block on its lowest height. But you can always up the hopping challenge by turning the block onto its middle or even highest height!) . After I play with a few hops, I lift one leg up into down dog split and then step my foot forward onto the block. Moving with focus & control, I try to lift up into Warrior 3 while standing on the block. . Having the block underfoot in Warrior 3 challenges our balance more than when that foot is flat on the floor, and it also causes the muscles of our standing leg to work more in order to maintain stability. . As just an option for your block-balanced Warrior 3, I added some “knee pulses” to the movement - bending & straightening my standing knee a few times as the rest of my body moves straight up and down in space with control. . If you decide to practice or teach either of these creative block-focused moves, let me know how they go for you! 💙 . . . . . #yogaprops #yogablock #handstand #inversion @jenni_rawlings jenni_rawlings Jenni Rawlings

  • Jenni Rawlings Here are two unique ways we can use a yoga block in our yoga practice - and neither of them involve making a pose easier! 😉
.
In the first part of this video, I place the block in the middle of my yoga mat and use it as a target to jump up and over from downward dog.
.
The physical presence of the block on our mat can naturally encourage us to hop *higher* (loading our shoulders more) and more *lightly* than we generally hop without this visual target.
.
Once we’ve experienced what it feels like to hop in a springier, higher manner, we can remove the block and attempt to re-create these same qualities in our normal hops forward 👍🏽
.
(In this video, I have the block on its lowest height. But you can always up the hopping challenge by turning the block onto its middle or even highest height!)
.
After I play with a few hops, I lift one leg up into down dog split and then step my foot forward onto the block. Moving with focus & control, I try to lift up into Warrior 3 while standing on the block.
.
Having the block underfoot in Warrior 3 challenges our balance more than when that foot is flat on the floor, and it also causes the muscles of our standing leg to work more in order to maintain stability.
.
As just an option for your block-balanced Warrior 3, I added some “knee pulses” to the movement - bending & straightening my standing knee a few times as the rest of my body moves straight up and down in space with control.
.
If you decide to practice or teach either of these creative block-focused moves, let me know how they go for you! 💙
.
.
.
.
.
#yogaprops #yogablock #handstand #inversion

    @jenni_rawlings

    2 weeks ago
  • Here are two unique ways we can use a yoga block in our yoga practice - and neither of them involve making a pose easier! 😉 . In the first part of this video, I place the block in the middle of my yoga mat and use it as a target to jump up and over from downward dog. . The physical presence of the block on our mat can naturally encourage us to hop *higher* (loading our shoulders more) and more *lightly* than we generally hop without this visual target. . Once we’ve experienced what it feels like to hop in a springier, higher manner, we can remove the block and attempt to re-create these same qualities in our normal hops forward 👍🏽 . (In this video, I have the block on its lowest height. But you can always up the hopping challenge by turning the block onto its middle or even highest height!) . After I play with a few hops, I lift one leg up into down dog split and then step my foot forward onto the block. Moving with focus & control, I try to lift up into Warrior 3 while standing on the block. . Having the block underfoot in Warrior 3 challenges our balance more than when that foot is flat on the floor, and it also causes the muscles of our standing leg to work more in order to maintain stability. . As just an option for your block-balanced Warrior 3, I added some “knee pulses” to the movement - bending & straightening my standing knee a few times as the rest of my body moves straight up and down in space with control. . If you decide to practice or teach either of these creative block-focused moves, let me know how they go for you! 💙 . . . . . #yogaprops #yogablock #handstand #inversion https://scontent-ams4-1.cdninstagram.com/vp/27bd9cdbd33f28f4f52ead961af21704/5D5F1C29/t51.2885-15/e35/68868107_150368156026399_4613687616564269291_n.jpg?_nc_ht=scontent-ams4-1.cdninstagram.com jenni_rawlings

    Here are two unique ways we can use a yoga block in our yoga practice - and neither of them involve making a pose easier! 😉
    .
    In the first part of this video, I place the block in the middle of my yoga mat and use it as a target to jump up and over from downward dog.
    .
    The physical presence of the block on our mat can naturally encourage us to hop *higher* (loading our shoulders more) and more *lightly* than we generally hop without this visual target.
    .
    Once we’ve experienced what it feels like to hop in a springier, higher manner, we can remove the block and attempt to re-create these same qualities in our normal hops forward 👍🏽
    .
    (In this video, I have the block on its lowest height. But you can always up the hopping challenge by turning the block onto its middle or even highest height!)
    .
    After I play with a few hops, I lift one leg up into down dog split and then step my foot forward onto the block. Moving with focus & control, I try to lift up into Warrior 3 while standing on the block.
    .
    Having the block underfoot in Warrior 3 challenges our balance more than when that foot is flat on the floor, and it also causes the muscles of our standing leg to work more in order to maintain stability.
    .
    As just an option for your block-balanced Warrior 3, I added some “knee pulses” to the movement - bending & straightening my standing knee a few times as the rest of my body moves straight up and down in space with control.
    .
    If you decide to practice or teach either of these creative block-focused moves, let me know how they go for you! 💙
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    #yogaprops #yogablock #handstand #inversion

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taichipeahen - Bay 2 weeks ago

I use yoga blocks for an unstable surface in my Stability classes for seniors. Also to step over. Perfect! Haven't thought of using them similarly in my yoga classes! Hehehe (evil laugh)

machado_ines - Ines Yoga NYC 2 weeks ago

I loved this little sequence! I've practice jumping the block, or blocks, before and also Warrior 3 on the block, it's a great work! But I'm curious to try the way you put this together, looks pretty challenging and fun! Thank you for sharing!🙏💥❤️

altyogavibe - Val ~ Yoga + Nutrition Coach 2 weeks ago

I love the block hops. I just talked about working on the jump from downward dog to standing forward fold. It’s such a hard one for me to keep consistent. I’m either super focused and land it decently or it’s just a tiny awkward hop. 🤷‍♀️ Thank you for the idea!