Powerlifting has an injury rate of approximately 1-4 injuries per 1000 participation hours, which is similar to other non-contact sports. For example, a prospective study of injuries 292 elite Swedish track and field athletes showed an incidence of 3.57 injuries per 1000 participation hours.(Jacobbson 2013) Conversely, popular contact sports like American football and wrestling have injury rates of 9.6 and 5.7 injuries per 1000 participation hours.(Hootman 2007) Resistance training injuries also don’t typically last that long, as symptoms tend to fade within 12 days. (Raske 2002) • There are a handful of risk factors that are typically given attention, but don’t really do much: gender, competitive standard, age, body weight, or weight lifted. Things that do make a difference? How well trained you are and how appropriate your programming is for your current level of training. • I wrote 28 pages and 11,708 words on this for this month’s Barbell Medicine Research Review and you can read more there. Alternatively, if you attended the @europeanpowerliftingcon this past weekend, you’d already know all of this 🤯🤯🤯 • What do you think? Tag someone that gets “injured” all the time and needs to read this. @jordan_barbellmedicine jordan_barbellmedicine Jordan Feigenbaum, MD, MS

  • jordan_barbellmedicine

    @jordan_barbellmedicine

    2 weeks ago
  • Heathrow Airport
  • Powerlifting has an injury rate of approximately 1-4 injuries per 1000 participation hours, which is similar to other non-contact sports. For example, a prospective study of injuries 292 elite Swedish track and field athletes showed an incidence of 3.57 injuries per 1000 participation hours.(Jacobbson 2013) Conversely, popular contact sports like American football and wrestling have injury rates of 9.6 and 5.7 injuries per 1000 participation hours.(Hootman 2007) Resistance training injuries also don’t typically last that long, as symptoms tend to fade within 12 days. (Raske 2002) • There are a handful of risk factors that are typically given attention, but don’t really do much: gender, competitive standard, age, body weight, or weight lifted. Things that do make a difference? How well trained you are and how appropriate your programming is for your current level of training. • I wrote 28 pages and 11,708 words on this for this month’s Barbell Medicine Research Review and you can read more there. Alternatively, if you attended the @europeanpowerliftingcon this past weekend, you’d already know all of this 🤯🤯🤯 • What do you think? Tag someone that gets “injured” all the time and needs to read this.
    Jordan Feigenbaum, MD, MS Powerlifting has an injury rate of approximately 1-4 injuries per 1000 participation hours, which is similar to other non-contact sports. For example, a prospective study of injuries 292 elite Swedish track and field athletes showed an incidence of 3.57 injuries per 1000 participation hours.(Jacobbson 2013) Conversely, popular contact sports like American football and wrestling have injury rates of 9.6 and 5.7 injuries per 1000 participation hours.(Hootman 2007)
Resistance training injuries also don’t typically last that long, as symptoms tend to fade within 12 days. (Raske 2002)
•
There are a handful of risk factors that are typically given attention, but don’t really do much: gender, competitive standard, age, body weight, or weight lifted. Things that do make a difference? How well trained you are and how appropriate your programming is for your current level of training.
•
I wrote 28 pages and 11,708 words on this for this month’s Barbell Medicine Research Review and you can read more there. Alternatively, if you attended the @europeanpowerliftingcon this past weekend, you’d already know all of this 🤯🤯🤯
•
What do you think? Tag someone that gets “injured” all the time and needs to read this.

    Powerlifting has an injury rate of approximately 1-4 injuries per 1000 participation hours, which is similar to other non-contact sports. For example, a prospective study of injuries 292 elite Swedish track and field athletes showed an incidence of 3.57 injuries per 1000 participation hours.(Jacobbson 2013) Conversely, popular contact sports like American football and wrestling have injury rates of 9.6 and 5.7 injuries per 1000 participation hours.(Hootman 2007)
    Resistance training injuries also don’t typically last that long, as symptoms tend to fade within 12 days. (Raske 2002)

    There are a handful of risk factors that are typically given attention, but don’t really do much: gender, competitive standard, age, body weight, or weight lifted. Things that do make a difference? How well trained you are and how appropriate your programming is for your current level of training.

    I wrote 28 pages and 11,708 words on this for this month’s Barbell Medicine Research Review and you can read more there. Alternatively, if you attended the @europeanpowerliftingcon this past weekend, you’d already know all of this 🤯🤯🤯

    What do you think? Tag someone that gets “injured” all the time and needs to read this.

  • 1,146 51
  • Save Image Other Pictures

Instagram jordan_barbellmedicine (Jordan Feigenbaum, MD, MS) Other GymLive Posts

k._veronica - Katie Yerkes 1 week ago

Curious for your thoughts on this condemnation of barbell deadlifts: https://www.stack.com/a/why-almost-no-one-should-straight-bar-deadlift It seems a bit like fear-mongering to me, but I’m wondering if there is any benefit to incorporating hex-bar deadlifts as someone who strength trains for health rather than competition (so has less of a need for specificity).

angaort - Angel 2 weeks ago

The question is what kind of injuries happen in Powerlifting unlike other sports. Because if the ratio is lower in Powerlifting but the injuries are mainly disc herniations or bulging discs (serious injuries) we are not seeing the whole picture.

mikanvika - Mika 2 weeks ago

Have you discussed the severity of injuries in contrast to other non-contact sports?

jessegilbride - Jesse 2 weeks ago

The only time I seem to get injured from resistance training is if my form slips or I've taken too much time off (and I get too aggressive with the return).