Photo by @williamalbertallard While documenting National Geographic’s essay, “Hunters: For Love of the Land” in 2007, I traveled to Iowa to photograph the annual migration and hunting of the snow goose. In many parts of the country, especially in areas known as the Midwest and Central Flyway, it is not uncommon to see more than 100,000 of these birds blanketing a farmer’s field as they travel south. In this image, a hunter rises from his pit blind to fire at a passing flock. The abundance of lesser snow, greater snow, and Ross’s geese – collectively known as light geese, is such that without hunting, they would destroy much of the natural resources from their range stretching from Canada to Mexico. Agricultural activities throughout North America have provided an unlimited buffet of corn and wheat for a migratory bird species that has exploded from fewer than 1 million birds in the late 1960s to an estimated 15 million today. In just the last two years, hunters across the country have harvested an estimated 800,000 birds. Wildlife managers say that harvesting two or three times as many birds is necessary to bring the population down to a manageable level. In order to prevent a catastrophic event of starvation and the continuation of habitat destruction, wildlife officials allow hunters in many states to harvest up to 25 (or more) birds a day throughout the lengthy hunting season. #followme @williamalbertallard for more images from Hunters: For Love of the Land and other assignments spanning five decades. @natgeo @thephotosociety @natgeocreative #hunting #hunter #geese #shotgun #goose #camo @natgeo natgeo National Geographic

  • natgeo

    @natgeo

    10 months ago
  • Iowa
  • Photo by @williamalbertallard While documenting National Geographic’s essay, “Hunters: For Love of the Land” in 2007, I traveled to Iowa to photograph the annual migration and hunting of the snow goose. In many parts of the country, especially in areas known as the Midwest and Central Flyway, it is not uncommon to see more than 100,000 of these birds blanketing a farmer’s field as they travel south. In this image, a hunter rises from his pit blind to fire at a passing flock. The abundance of lesser snow, greater snow, and Ross’s geese – collectively known as light geese, is such that without hunting, they would destroy much of the natural resources from their range stretching from Canada to Mexico. Agricultural activities throughout North America have provided an unlimited buffet of corn and wheat for a migratory bird species that has exploded from fewer than 1 million birds in the late 1960s to an estimated 15 million today. In just the last two years, hunters across the country have harvested an estimated 800,000 birds. Wildlife managers say that harvesting two or three times as many birds is necessary to bring the population down to a manageable level. In order to prevent a catastrophic event of starvation and the continuation of habitat destruction, wildlife officials allow hunters in many states to harvest up to 25 (or more) birds a day throughout the lengthy hunting season. #followme @williamalbertallard for more images from Hunters: For Love of the Land and other assignments spanning five decades. @natgeo @thephotosociety @natgeocreative #hunting #hunter #geese #shotgun #goose #camo
    National Geographic Photo by @williamalbertallard 
While documenting National Geographic’s essay, “Hunters: For Love of the Land” in 2007, I traveled to Iowa to photograph the annual migration and hunting of the snow goose. In many parts of the country, especially in areas known as the Midwest and Central Flyway, it is not uncommon to see more than 100,000 of these birds blanketing a farmer’s field as they travel south. In this image, a hunter rises from his pit blind to fire at a passing flock. The abundance of lesser snow, greater snow, and Ross’s geese – collectively known as light geese, is such that without hunting, they would destroy much of the natural resources from their range stretching from Canada to Mexico. Agricultural activities throughout North America have provided an unlimited buffet of corn and wheat for a migratory bird species that has exploded from fewer than 1 million birds in the late 1960s to an estimated 15 million today. In just the last two years, hunters across the country have harvested an estimated 800,000 birds. Wildlife managers say that harvesting two or three times as many birds is necessary to bring the population down to a manageable level. In order to prevent a catastrophic event of starvation and the continuation of habitat destruction, wildlife officials allow hunters in many states to harvest up to 25 (or more) birds a day throughout the lengthy hunting season.

#followme @williamalbertallard for more images from Hunters: For Love of the Land and other assignments spanning five decades. 
@natgeo @thephotosociety @natgeocreative 
#hunting #hunter #geese #shotgun #goose #camo

    Photo by @williamalbertallard
    While documenting National Geographic’s essay, “Hunters: For Love of the Land” in 2007, I traveled to Iowa to photograph the annual migration and hunting of the snow goose. In many parts of the country, especially in areas known as the Midwest and Central Flyway, it is not uncommon to see more than 100,000 of these birds blanketing a farmer’s field as they travel south. In this image, a hunter rises from his pit blind to fire at a passing flock. The abundance of lesser snow, greater snow, and Ross’s geese – collectively known as light geese, is such that without hunting, they would destroy much of the natural resources from their range stretching from Canada to Mexico. Agricultural activities throughout North America have provided an unlimited buffet of corn and wheat for a migratory bird species that has exploded from fewer than 1 million birds in the late 1960s to an estimated 15 million today. In just the last two years, hunters across the country have harvested an estimated 800,000 birds. Wildlife managers say that harvesting two or three times as many birds is necessary to bring the population down to a manageable level. In order to prevent a catastrophic event of starvation and the continuation of habitat destruction, wildlife officials allow hunters in many states to harvest up to 25 (or more) birds a day throughout the lengthy hunting season.

    #followme @williamalbertallard for more images from Hunters: For Love of the Land and other assignments spanning five decades.
    @natgeo @thephotosociety @natgeocreative
    #hunting #hunter #geese #shotgun #goose #camo

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penitentheretic - Hayate Yukimura 10 months ago

This comment section is cancerous. The majority of them didn’t even read the post along with the very valid reasons as to why this type of hunting is a good thing, and even more of whom probably lack the intelligence to fathom a long term picture outside of their own immediate personal pride. ‘I’m against violence. I love all life (except humans). Me good. Hunters bad.’ Incredibly mature mentality..

kevinack1 - Kevin Ackernecht 9 months ago

Hunters contribute more money to conservation and recovery of species than any other “group” thank you @natgeo for highlighting this. You want to meet a true animal lover? Sit down and talk to hunter